How to tie this knot

The trickiest knot tricks

Mooring boats, tying up robbers, tying up horses - all no problem if you have a piece of rope at hand and can tie the right knot in a few simple steps. We'll show you how to get the greatest loops. And not only are they practical, they also look pretty good!

ROBBER KNOTS

The ROBBER KNOT disappears without a trace if you pull on it. But only if you pluck at the right end. The other is bombproof. This knot allegedly got its name from the Wild West: Because bank robbers tied their horses with it - and freed them with a single movement of the hand if they had to flee quickly.

1

In addition to your rope, you also need a rod for this knot, for example a broomstick. First put a loop over it, like in the picture.

2

Take the short end of the string twice and push it through the loop from the front.

3

Finally, you pull the knot tightly together. At the long end (where the horse is attached to robbers) you can now pull and tear as you want - the knot holds. At the short end, on the other hand, a little jerk is enough and the rope releases the rod.

PALSTEK

The PALSTEK is the perfect loop knot! If you want a loop that won't close even under the greatest strain, tie this sailor's knot. The motto for forgetful sailors reveals how this works: "The crocodile comes out of the pond, crawls around the tree and submerges again." Behind this is the following:

1

First you put a loop like in the picture; this is the pond. Then you lead the crocodile, i.e. one end of the string, in a circle before you push it through the loop from below.

2

Put the "crocodile end" of the string around behind the other end - the tree - and put it back into the loop from above.

3

Now all you have to do is tighten the structure. Incidentally, the bowline can be opened again without any problems, no matter how tightly it is pulled.

LASSO SLING

The LASSO SLING was not invented by sailors but by cowboys. In contrast to the bowline, it is easy to open and close. This is also more practical for catching cattle or horses ...

1

First you put a loop as if you wanted to make a bowline. But then the crocodile comes straight out of the pond, so to speak.

2

Now you put the rope in a second, larger loop and lead it back as in the picture. Hold the string by the larger loop and both ends and pull the knot together.

3

To prevent this loop from coming undone, secure the short end (A) with a simple knot. Pull the long end (B) through the loop. This creates the noose (C) with which you can now catch cows.

MONKEY FIST

The AFFENFAUST owes its name to its shape. Sailors do not only tie this elegant knob for decoration: If they want to throw a rope particularly far, they knot one end into a monkey's fist - it flies better that way. Of all the knots presented here, the monkey fist is the most difficult. So do not despair if it does not turn out so smoothly at the beginning - that is purely a matter of practice!

1

First you put the cord in a triple loop, ideally by wrapping it around two fingers. Leave some air between your fingers - this will make it easier for you to tie the next loops.

2

The three vertical loops are followed by three horizontal loops. The picture shows you how you have to wrap this.

3

Now it gets tricky because at this point you have to wipe your half-finished monkey fist off your fingers - without everything falling apart! Once you have done that, you thread the last three loops through the others and lead the end of the cord out of the mess. You achieve the uniform shape by pulling each of the loops tight one after the other.

JAPAN NOTES

Do you always have this problem when you wrap gifts? Either the tape doesn't hold up, or it looks creepy - with lots of thick, ugly knots. The remedy in this case is the JAPAN NOTES. It's pretty - and firm!

1

It's best to use two pieces of string to practice. Double the end of one and make a loop.

2

Also double the end of the other line and thread it around the first loop as you can see in the picture.

3

Bring the second end out of the loop and carefully pull the knot together.

TRUMPET STRING

Sailors don't crochet. They prefer to knot the TRUMPET STRING, also called chain plating. This is very useful if you want to shorten a rope without cutting it - for example the connection cable of a dining table lamp.

1

You can almost guess: the trumpet cord also begins with a simple loop.

2

You pull a second loop through this first loop. And so it goes on: You thread a third through the second, a fourth through the third - until you are tired or your cord runs out.

3

In the end, however, you have to lead the rest of the line through the last loop as you can see in the picture. Otherwise all efforts were in vain: Without this degree, the whole "trumpet" would dissolve into pleasure with a brief jolt.

CROSS NODES

The CROSS KNOT is one of the most important and widely used knots. It is ideal for connecting two ropes or straps or for tying up a package. However: The square knot has its quirks - it only holds between two lines of the same type. If you want to extend your linen cord with packaging tape, you will fail with this knot.

1

First connect the two ends with a simple knot. Pay attention to which rope is on top.

2

Now you make a second knot. The end that was on top the first time must be on top again.

3

Pull the whole thing together at all four ends - the square knot is ready.