What is meant when some say checkmate

Lesson planning checkmate intermediate / advanced level

Transcript

1 00 / Checkmate Lesson planning Checkmate Intermediate / Advanced 1/3 No. Topic Content Objectives Action Material Organization Time 0 Teacher information 1 Chess what is it? 2 Rules and Figures 3 Stories and Legends 4 Chess and Language 5 Interview The basic text provides a lot of information and details about the didactic and methodical embedding of the topic of chess in the classroom. The students write down their thoughts and associations on the subject of chess, which come to their minds based on various illustrations. The information is deepened with a subsequent worksheet. The Sch recognize the basic rules that are important to the game of chess. The meaning and strength of the pieces as well as the core objectives of a chess game are explained with a guard run. The students read and illustrate 2 classic stories related to the game of chess. In a discussion, the students try to find out which key statements are made in the texts and how these are to be interpreted. Different terms and idioms are used in the game. The Sch deal with their meaning and origin. In an interview, the students learn what fascinates a young chess player from the national team about this game and what experiences he has had in his chess career. Preliminary information for the teacher, background knowledge The students know the game of chess and the basic idea behind this game. The Sch know the basics and the pieces of the game of chess. The Sch realize that the subject or motif of chess has been present for many centuries. The Sch realize that chess is an international game and is anchored in different languages ​​and cultures. The students recognize the opportunities and fascination of the subject of chess that the game opens up for young people. - Information text - - Make thoughts on the topic of chess and express them, solve the worksheet Gather learning information, understand it Read, illustrate and discuss stories Solve the worksheet with fill in the blank Read or look at the interview, fill out the questionnaire Pictures Worksheet Item material chessboards Further exercises and work steps: Documentation from the SSB, additional information Stories Illustrations Plenum EA 30 GA 90 PA / EA Plenum 45 Worksheet EA 30 Interview as text or in digital form Questionnaire EA / Plenum 45

2 00 / Checkmate Lesson planning Checkmate intermediate / advanced level 2/3 No. Topic Content Objectives Action Material Organization Time 6 Making a chess game yourself 7 Chess tournament The students receive the instructions to sketch and construct a chessboard themselves. The students organize a chess tournament, create the game board and run the tournament independently. The Sch know the basic dimensions and shapes of the figures. You can combine your manual skills with the top-heavy game. The Sch optimize their organizational and planning skills. Read construction instructions, understand, implement, plan, organize The times given are assumptions for the approximate time frame and can vary depending on the class, level and intensity of the lesson! Instructions Depending on the implementation, various material (see description) Tournament table Div. Material (see planning) For chess boards and pieces, contact the SSB (see additional information) PA / EA GA n.a. n / a

3 00 / Checkmate Lesson planning Checkmate middle / advanced level 3/3 Supplements / Variants Key information Contact addresses EA = individual work / plenary = the whole class / GA = group work / PA = partner work / Sch = pupils / LP = teacher Website of the Swiss Chess Federation (SSB): Website of the official material supplier: Books, excursions, projects Chess school: Possible projects for your school class: - School trip to a garden chess - Create school chess / garden chess in handicraft lessons - Organize tournaments in the school / in the village - Incorporate chess as an intermediate exercise in class (blitz chess games ) Own notes

4 01 / Checkmate Chess what is it? Teacher information 1/4 Work assignment The students write down their thoughts and associations on the subject of chess, which come to their minds based on various illustrations. Make thoughts on the subject of chess and express them; Solve worksheet. Objective The students know the game of chess and the basic idea behind this game. Material Pictures Worksheet Social Form Plenum EA Time 30

5 01 / Checkmate Chess what is it? Worksheet 2/4 Task 1: Chess is a strategy game that has existed for a long time. Do you know this game Write down in the fields what you already know about chess and what you would like to know more. Chess I want to know:

6 01 / Checkmate Chess what is it? Worksheet 3/4 Exercise 2: Some things have gotten mixed up here. Bring order into the chaos and connect the correct parts of the text together. Chess The term chess comes from Persian and means The aim of the game is to checkmate you! The chess board consists of square fields. At the beginning of a game there are pieces on the chess game. The figure that is most often represented in the game is the (namely 16 times). The term checkmate comes from Arabic and means In chess there is also a tie. This is called Urschach comes from North India and is called. In the year 1283 the first chess set of rules appeared in 1769 the first chess machine was called the Turk Draw The King is defeated Spain Pawn Chaturanga Royal game King 64 32

7 01 / Checkmate Chess what is it? Solutions 4/4 Solution: The term chess comes from the Persian and means The aim of the game is to checkmate you! The chessboard consists of square fields. At the beginning of a game there are pieces on the chess game. The figure that is most frequently represented at the game is the (namely 16 times). The term checkmate comes from Arabic and means In chess there is also a tie. This is called Urschach comes from North India and is called. In the year 1283 the first chess set of rules appeared in 1769 the first chess machine was called it was called Royal game King pawn The king is defeated draw Chaturanga Spain the Turk

8 02 / Checkmate Rules and Figures Teacher Information 1/18 Task Objective The students recognize the basic rules that are important for the game of chess. The meaning and strength of the pieces as well as the core objectives of a chess game are explained with a guard run. Capture and understand learning information The students know the basics and the figures of the game of chess. Material Post material chess boards Further exercises and work steps: Documentation of the SSB additional information Social type Group work Time 90 Additional information: Here you will find extensive teaching aids and teaching materials that can be purchased. Advice and information are also provided if you want to launch appropriate offers or courses in the school environment.

9 02 / Checkmate rules and figures Item sheets 2/18 Task: Complete the available items in a small group. Take notes on each item and solve the worksheets and exercises that are available. Control sheet item topic completed? 1 The pieces and their moves 2 The starting line-up 3 Attack, capture and resurrection 4 Stalemate, draw and tie 5 Special special rules Write down questions or ambiguities here that should be discussed with the whole class:

10 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 3/18 Item 1: Each piece on the chess field has a certain value. Different moves can be made depending on the figure. By moving the pieces onto the different squares, you can, for example, capture the other pieces. A chess player knows exactly which pieces he has to move with in order to corner his opponent or surprise him with his strategy. In the following compilation you will get to know the individual characters and their strengths. Then try to solve the given task. The pieces and their moves King The king is the most important piece in chess because the aim of the game is to mate the opposing king, which ends the game immediately. To mate means to threaten the opposing king with one (or more) pieces without him being able to get to safety. Move: The king can move one square in each direction per move. Queen The queen is the strongest piece in a game of chess. Move: The queen can move to any free space in any direction (horizontally, vertically and diagonally) without jumping over other pieces. It thus combines the effect of both a tower and a runner. This makes the lady the most agile figure. Rook The rook is the second strongest piece in a game of chess. In the origins of the game in Persia, the tower was probably a chariot that was depicted as a block of wood with several notches. The Europeans misinterpreted this as a crenellated tower. Move: A tower can move as far as it likes on lines and rows in any direction, but without jumping over other pieces.

11 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces control sheets 4/18 bishops At the beginning of a game each party has one white-squared and one black-squared bishop. A distinction is also made between women’s runner and king’s runner based on their positioning next to the queen or the king. Move: Bishops move diagonally across the board on the fields of the color they are standing on. They are not allowed to move over other pieces. Knight A game of chess begins with two white and two black knights. The older name Rössel is only used today in connection with the Rösselsprung, a type of puzzle. The specialty of the jumpers is to be able to jump over their own and opposing pieces and pawns. Move: The knight moves from the starting square two squares along a line or row and then one square to the left or right. The target field always has a different color than the starting field. Pawn Each player has eight pawns at the start of the game. The pawn is considered the weakest piece in chess. In contrast to the other pieces, the pawn cannot move backwards, only forwards. Move: In the starting position the pawn can either move one step forward if the target field is empty, or take a double step if the field in front of the pawn and the target field are empty. If the pawn is not in the starting position, he can only move one space forward. The pawn strikes forward diagonally. It is the only piece that hits in a different direction than the direction of move.

12 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 5/18 Task: Can you see which piece has completed the respective path? Warning: sometimes several solutions are possible.

13 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 6/18 Item 2: If you want to start a game of chess, you have to place the pieces correctly on the field. There are important rules to be observed, which are described below. Then try to solve the given task. The initial setup 1. Alignment of the board The chessboard consists of 8 x 8 square fields: 32 light and 32 dark fields. The board is correct when there is a black field at the bottom left! 2. The numbering All fields have a name. This can be found out by first looking at the lower bar and then looking at the right bar: a b c d e f g h c5 g1 b2

14 02 / Checkmate Rules and Figures Control Sheets 7/18 3. The starting position When making the line-up, make sure that the color of the queen always matches the color of the field. If you start a game, the player may begin with the white (or light) pieces! Task: Find the 9 mistakes!

15 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 8/18 Item 3 An important intermediate goal in chess is attacking and capturing opposing pieces. The player moves his pieces forwards or backwards. If an opposing piece is on his move, he can attack it. Read through the information and then try to solve the problem. Attack, capture and convert Here a rook attacks the knight: If the white rook hits the black knight, the black knight is removed from the board. The character is no longer allowed to take part in the game! The knight passes the pawn on D3 on his way to space D4. Does the farmer now have to be taken off the field? No! The jumper is allowed to jump over pieces, but has no influence on those jumped over. If the pawn were to stand one space further up, i.e. on D4, the knight's target, the pawn would be eliminated from the game.

16 02 / Checkmate Rules and pieces Post sheets 9/18 White's turn A tricky situation for the rook! We know that the tower can only pull horizontally or vertically. This gives him three options: 1. The king is not threatened here because the pawn is protecting him. Should the rook defeat the pawn, the king can then attack the rook. Here the tower would be sacrificed unnecessarily. 2. The rook can hold the position and the player can move another piece. However, the runner is a threat: it does not cover a piece, so it can move. If the runner hit the tower, he would not be threatened by any opponent afterwards. 3. The rook moves to the white space between it and the bishop (C6). So the rook remains in play and poses a potential threat to the bishop and the pawn / king. Which move is ultimately made depends on how the remaining pieces are in play and what the players' strategy is. Maybe it makes sense to move the tower far away. In chess, not only do pieces disappear, they can also be transformed! And this is how it works: If a pawn manages to cross the entire board and move to a space on the upper edge during the game, the player can replace this piece with any one! This is how a pawn can become a lady. But be careful: There can be several women, even if there are already some. But getting a second king is not possible!

17 02 / Checkmate Rules and Figures Item Pages 10/18 Task: Attack the King! Different situations await you, and in each of them you have to mate the opponent's black king with one move! Make a note of your moves (start destination; e.g. C3 C5).

18 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 11/18

19 02 / Checkmate rules and figures Item sheets 12/18 There are four 1-move-mate options here. Find her!

20 02 / Checkmate rules and figures Item sheets 13/18 Item 4: As in many sports, in chess there is a winner and a loser. But it is also possible to play a draw, i.e. a tie. Below are some explanations to read through; then try to solve the tasks. Stalemate, draw and tie A draw can arise if both players agree on a tie ahead of time. If both players only have the king left in front of them, the game also ends in a draw. Another form of draw occurs in a so-called stalemate. Here the opponent is not in check, but can no longer make a move without being in check. Here is an example: This is a classic stalemate situation where it is Black's turn. The two black pawns cannot be moved because their path is blocked and there is no possibility of capturing an opponent. The king is the only figure that could theoretically move. He is not in check at the moment, but he is in check with every possible move. The queen acts on every square that the king could enter.

21 02 / Checkmate Rules and Figures Item Sheets 14/18 Task: Try to solve the tasks! The king is in chess. Therefore he moves to the field H8. Is it now stalemate? Give reasons for your answer. The black player made the last move (pawn D2 D1) and receives a queen! Assess the situation and say what is likely to happen next.

22 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 15/18 Item 5: In chess there are also some special rules. Read through the descriptions and then try to solve the tasks. Special special rules Castling Castling enables every player to quickly bring his king from the middle of the board to the edge. In the same turn a tower gets closer to the action. So this is a double move. First, Second, Third, Castling may only be moved once per player in a game! These are further prerequisites for castling: 1. The king and the rook to be cast with have not yet been moved. 2. The spaces between the rook concerned and the king are free. Third, Second, First, The king is not in check at the moment of castling. 4. The squares that the king crosses during castling are not threatened. 5. The square on which the king moves is not occupied by an opposing piece.

23 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Item sheets 16/18 Capturing while passing In the past, a pawn was only allowed to move forward one square at a time. In order to give the game more dynamism, the rule was subsequently introduced that a pawn can move two spaces forward on the first move. If, after this two-square move, the pawn stands next to an opposing pawn, he may capture the pawn he just moved as if he had only moved one square.Example: Touched Guided Touched Guided, an important rule in chess! If you touch a figure, you move it, and as soon as you let go of it, your turn is over. The same applies if a player touches an opponent's piece in order to take it off the field: Here, too, the move is made. Task: Create different chess situations in your group on the subject of capturing in passing and castling. Discuss together how to draw in these situations and justify your decisions. You can compare your results with other groups later!

24 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Solutions 17/18 Solutions: Item 1: Queen, rook jumper queen, rook queen, bishop king, queen, rook queen, rook queen, rook, pawn king, queen, rook, pawn jumper queen, bishop Queen, rook jumper

25 02 / Checkmate rules and pieces Solutions 18/18 Item 2 Item 3 b5 b7 b6 e3 h1 g1 or h1 h7 a2 c4 a5 e1 h4 d8 e5 e8 or e5 a8 or f1 f8 or e5 g7 Item 4 There is no mate or stalemate because it is still the white player's turn. He can move to g7 with the queen (f7): Now it's mate. The move with the pawn came about because the king cannot move. All fields around the king are threatened. The resulting lady no longer contributes to the game. The white player can mate the king with the move e7 e5 or f6 d6.

26 03 / Checkmate Stories and Legends Teacher Information 1/4 Task Objective The students read and illustrate 2 classic stories that are associated with the game of chess. In a discussion, the students try to find out which key statements are made in the texts and how these are to be interpreted. The Sch realize that the subject or motif of chess has been present for many centuries. Material Stories Illustrations Social Form PA / EA Plenum Time 45 Additional information: The Schachnovelle by Stefan Zweig ISBN-10: ISBN-13:

27 03 / Checkmate Stories and Legends Stories 2/4 Task: Here you will find some descriptions and excerpts from various books that deal with the topic of chess. Read through the stories and choose 2 texts that you then illustrate. You can then discuss in class which key statements are made in the texts and how they are to be interpreted. The legend of the rice grain The legend is very well known and has been passed on for years and generations. Many versions were created, and some narrators have changed the story, but the core of the legend always remains the same. According to an old legend, a king named Sher Khan once lived in India. During his reign, someone invented the game that is now called chess. This game should not only offer the king amusement, but also teach him. In the kingdom the king is supposed to form a unit with his peasants and officers. The king was so enthusiastic about this noble game that he had the inventor of the game summoned to the royal court. When the inventor, a wise man, came before him, the king said he would give him a reward for this fine invention. He was rich and powerful enough to fulfill his every wish, no matter how unusual it was. The man was silent for a while and thought. The king encouraged him and said that he should not show any shyness and simply express his wish. The wise man answered the king to give him a grain of rice on a chess field. The king laughed and asked him if that was really all, he could ask for more! The man replied that he would like two grains of rice on the second field, four on the third, eight on the fourth, and sixteen on the fifth. The king's advisers began to laugh uproariously because they thought this wish was extremely stupid. After all, the man could have wished for gold, precious stones, land or anything else. The king had given his word and would have to shower him with riches if this man asked. The king was angry because he thought the inventor thought he was too poor or too stingy. He said that he would give him grains of rice for all fields, twice as many grains in each field as in the field in front of it. But the wish is stupid because it could have given him much more. The king sent the inventor of the chess game out of the palace and made him wait at the gate. That was where his rice would be brought to him. The wise man went out smiling, softly. He sat down at the gate and waited patiently for his reward. In the evening, King Sher Khan remembered the strange wish and asked whether the inventor had already received his reward. His advisors grew nervous and said they couldn't have matched the reward - it was just way too much and the granaries didn't have enough rice to pay off the man. Then the king got angry and scolded that they should finally give the man his reward, after all he had promised and the king's word was valid. Then his advisers and the court mathematician declared that there was not enough rice in the entire kingdom to satisfy the man's wish. Yes, that there wasn't that much rice in the whole world. If he wants to keep his word, he has to buy all the land in the world, turn it into rice fields and even have the oceans drained as arable land to be able to plant enough rice. King Sher Khan was stunned. Then he asked how many grains of rice there were, was the answer. Then the king laughed uproariously. He summoned the wise man and made him his new advisor.

28 03 / Checkmate Stories and Legends Stories 3/4 The Schachnovelle (summary) The Schachnovelle is a book written by Stefan Zweig and published in 1942 after his death. It's a well-known story and one of the author's best works. Now you can read a simple summary of the book: The world chess champion Mirko Czentovic is also traveling aboard a passenger steamer that is on its way from New York to Buenos Aires. He is challenged to a simultaneous game by a smug millionaire for a fee. Czentovic is not able to read and write and dominates the royal game almost automatically, like a machine. The first game against the world chess champion is lost. In the second game, a strange gentleman, the Austrian émigré Dr. B., advising in the almost lost game. He saves a draw against the world chess champion (tie). Dr. B. was arrested by the Gestapo as an asset manager of large monasteries during the Nazi era. He was held in a hotel room while in detention. Dr. B. could only save himself from nervous wear and tear and mental erosion by memorizing a collection of 150 master games for months. He was able to steal the book with the master's games from the coat of a military officer. This book offered him a suitable occupation against the monotony of his imprisonment. But when he knew all the games by heart, it lost all appeal for him. So he fell into the mental schizophrenia of playing against himself. This chess poisoning caused him to develop a nervous fever. When he went nuts, he was transferred to a hospital. The hospital doctor obtained his discharge. For the first time since his imprisonment, Dr. B. now again chess on a real chessboard and against a human opponent. After he made a draw against the world chess champion, he lets himself be persuaded to play further games. In the first game he beats Czentovic. During the second game he falls back into his nervous fever. The reason for this was that Czentovic delayed the time. That's why Dr. B. out of boredom to deal with imaginary parts in the head. Dr. B. threatens to go crazy again and must be removed from the chessboard. He has never touched a chessboard since then.

29 03 / Checkmate Stories and Legends Stories 4/4 Short chess anecdotes and quotes B-CLASS Competition in the B-Class. Ingo slams his queen in the face of the opposing king and calls out just as energetically: Checkmate! Oh, I didn't see that at all, says the person opposite and holds out his hand to him. Immediately Ingo pushes the figures together, since he noticed that his lady had no backing whatsoever. After about a quarter of an hour his opponent approaches him: You say, your queen wasn't covered at all! Yes, but now it's too late, because you've already given up, Ingo grins at him. Christmas lightning My father-in-law played in the chess club in his hometown Herzogenaurach for decades. Every year shortly before Christmas there was a blitz tournament, the first prize of which was a goose. At the proud age of eighty my father-in-law came home with the goose beaming with joy. The secret suspicion that his club colleagues had let him win was refuted a year later and he came back with a goose! Chess quote tactic is knowing what to do when there is something to be done. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. (Savielly Tartakower)

30 04 / Checkmate Chess and Language Teacher Information 1/3 Assignment Various terms and expressions are used in the game. The Sch deal with their meaning and origin. Goal The Sch realize that chess is an international game and that it is anchored in different languages ​​and cultures. Material worksheet social type EA time 30

31 04 / Checkmate Chess and Language Worksheet 2/3 Try to insert the words below into the text in the gap: Task: Checkmate 2 x en passant 4 x draw chess stalemate Gardez fool mate Note 2 x castling Conversion queen 3 x king shepherd move in passing Starting position is a draw chess international chess is a popular game played almost all over the world. So that players from different nations and origins can understand each other, some basic terms have to be the same everywhere. For example, the threat is announced with the word, and if there is no way out, an is added. There is also a word for them to announce their threat. In this case the player can (but does not have to) announce the threat. The threat to the queen is less and less announced today, but it can sometimes offer strategic advantages (e.g. to draw the opponent's attention to his threatened queen). In chess, different sequences of moves have a name, for example this. This sequence of moves represents the fastest checkmate that is possible. The so-called is also a sequence of moves with which the opposing king is captured in a few moves. In chess there is a move in which several pieces are moved. This train is called. Another specialty in chess is capturing or translating. Here a pawn who has moved two squares forward can be captured by an opposing pawn as if he had only moved one square. This right only exists immediately after the opponent has made a double move. In general, pawns should never be underestimated in chess! A farmer can become more valuable than you think. When he reaches the last space opposite his, he can be exchanged for any other piece. It does not matter whether this is already there or not. The only exception: there can never be a second! This is called. Another term that is used internationally is that. For example, a is and exists as soon as the king is not threatened, but that player can no longer make a move without being threatened. Another is when both players only play with the player or come to an agreement voluntarily after a long game. So generally defines a. So that a game of chess can be replayed or analyzed at a later point in time, every move made by the players is recorded. This is called in chess. There are also special spellings for the special trains. So 0 0 stands for the small and for the large. If a farmer is beaten, this is done in German-speaking countries with i.v. or e.p. noted. International is e.p. the standard.

32 04 / Checkmate Chess and Language Solution 3/3 Solution: Chess is a popular game that is played almost all over the world. So that players from different nations and origins can understand each other, some basic terms have to be the same everywhere. For example, the threat to the king is announced with the word chess, and if there is no way out, a checkmate is added. There is also a word for the lady to announce her threat. In this case the player can (but does not have to) announce the threat with Gardez. The threat to the queen is less and less announced today, but it can sometimes offer strategic advantages (e.g. to draw the opponent's attention to his threatened queen). In chess, different sequences of moves have a name, for example the fool's mate. This sequence of moves represents the fastest mate that is ever possible. The so-called shepherd move is also a sequence of moves with which the opposing king is defeated in a few moves. In chess there is a move in which several pieces are moved. This move is called castling. Another specialty in chess is capturing en passant or translated in passing. Here a pawn who has moved two squares forward can be captured by an opposing pawn as if he had only moved one square. This right only exists immediately after the opponent has made a double move. In general, pawns should never be underestimated in chess! A farmer can become more valuable than you think. When he reaches the last square opposite his starting position, he can be exchanged for any other piece. It does not matter whether this is already there or not. The only exception: there can never be a second king! This is called conversion. Another term that is used internationally is the draw. For example, a stalemate is a draw and exists as soon as the king is not threatened, but that player cannot make a move without being threatened. Another draw occurs when both players only play with the king or come to an agreement voluntarily after a long game. Generally speaking, a draw defines a tie. So that a game of chess can be replayed or analyzed at a later point in time, every move made by the players is recorded. This is called noting in chess. There are also special spellings for the special trains. So 0 0 stands for small and large castling. If a farmer is beaten en passant, this is done in German-speaking countries with i.v. or e.p. noted. International is e.p. the standard.

33 05 / Checkmate Interview Teacher Information 1/7 Task Objective In an interview, the students learn what fascinates a young chess player from the national team about this game and what experiences he has had in his chess career! Read the interview Fill out the questionnaire The students recognize the opportunities and fascination of the subject of chess that the game opens up for young people. Material interview as text questionnaire social type EA / plenum time 45

34 05 / Checkmate Interview Interview with Noël Studer 2/7 Task: Read the interview with Noël Studer and then try to answer the question sheet. Interview with Noël Portrait Name: Noël Studer Age: 14 years Place of residence: Muri BE School: Gymnasium Neufeld Successes: 2010: Swiss champion in team competition 2008: 2nd place in the Swiss championship, second highest division Since member of the junior national team, participation in 3 international championships. 1. How long have you been playing chess and what fascinated you about this sport? I played chess with my father for the first time. I was only six years old then. When I was nine years old, I took a chess course during the spring break. It pulled my sleeve up there! I noticed that the game appeals to me because there are countless possibilities and strategies. No two games are the same. 2. Who taught you to play chess? As a little boy I wanted to play the strategy game Stratego. My father said I should start with chess and showed me the basics of the game. 3. How much time do you spend in a week improving your chess techniques? In order to stay on the necessary level, I train around an hour a day. Twice a week I train for one hour with a chess grandmaster from Germany on Skype. Once a week I practice with an international master from Switzerland. We look at different moves and strategies together, prepare for the next tournament. When I train alone, I work with chess databases, books and chess online portals. Professional training is hardly possible today without digital aids and websites! The tournaments take place on the weekends. I work there for 5 to 10 hours at a time.

35 05 / Checkmate Interview Interview with Noël Studer 3/7 4. Training and chess competitions take a lot of time. How do you cope with school? I go to the Neufeld grammar school in Bern. Here there is the possibility that I can use 3 lessons for the game of chess per week. In the summer, however, I change schools and come to a special athlete class. I have 10 less lessons per week and can focus optimally on chess training. For this, the training lasts 1 year longer. The game of chess also helps me for the normal lessons. It is easy for me to follow the lessons and to classify and structure the essential content. 5. What are your hobbies and interests apart from playing chess? I do a lot of sports: soccer, ping pong.I was in the football club for a while, but now I've set my priorities a little differently due to the targeted training. It is important that as a chess player you are physically and physically fit. Those who lose their stamina during a 10-hour tournament have no chance of winning a game! 6. What was your happiest moment related to chess? I have already won the Swiss team competition twice. Once with the juniors and once in a junior-adult tournament. These are great experiences and successes that spur me on. The meetings of the U18 national team in Magglingen are always special. You meet up with colleagues from all over Switzerland, train together and can also experience a lot of other things together. In addition, of course, there is participation in international events, which are always a highlight of the year! 7. Do you already have long-term ideas for your future? What kind of job do you want to do and how should your chess career continue? After my time at high school, I'll turn on a professional year. So I can find out what it's like to travel from one tournament to the next. To bear the title of Grandmaster once would be a great thing! Professionally, I would like to follow in my father's footsteps and study law and take the bar exam. 8. What does chess mean for you and your family? For me it basically means fun, contacts with friends on a national and international level and a sporting challenge. My parents support me in my passion. On the one hand financially and organizationally, on the other hand, because they are also interested in sport. My mother and father also play chess and were infected with the chess virus. 9. What do you think of chess computers? As already mentioned, targeted training is hardly possible without the help of computers and databases. The moves and games of most chess players are stored on the largest platform, Chess-Base. With this help you can optimally prepare for the next competition. You can replay certain sequences from different games and try to understand the way of thinking of the next opponent. 10. When you train, who do you play against? I often play with colleagues on the computer or together with the juniors of the chess club, where I already give courses and training. 11. Who was the most famous person you got to play against? I had the chance to play against the Bulgarian player and world champion Topalov. A simultaneous chess game took place on the occasion of a tournament in Zurich. The grandmaster played chess against several people at the same time. I was selected as one of the strongest juniors in Switzerland and was allowed to play in this game. I made a draw!

36 05 / Checkmate Interview Interview with Noël Studer 4/7 12. Which piece is your favorite piece on the chessboard? The lady as a figure, who can drive almost all trains, is certainly very important to me. Otherwise, I like the jumper because it can be very tricky and the way it moves is rather unconventional. 13. What kind of tip would you like to give chess beginners on the way? My philosophy on the chessboard is this: Every chess piece on the board wants to have fun and play along. Every character wants to have a role. That means, you should always put yourself in the shoes of the individual figures and recognize the meaning of the figure. That might sound a bit special: I always try to speak to the individual characters, each character has a say in the game! In addition, arrogance is one of the biggest weaknesses in this game. If you have the feeling that you have no problem with your opponent and you hit them with the left, you've already lost!

37 05 / Checkmate Interview Questionnaire 5/7 Questionnaire on Noël 1. What profession does Noël want to pursue later? 2. What character does the young professional chess player like, apart from the queen, and why? 3. What is a great thing for Noël in his future planning? 4. How does he feel about the chess computers? 5. What does Noël's weekly training look like?

38 05 / Checkmate Interview Questionnaire 6/7 Questionnaire about yourself 1. Do you have a sporting or other hobby that you enjoy and that you devote a lot of time to? 2. Hobbies take up time. How do you divide the time for your hobbies and school? 3. Have you already thought about what your professional future looks like and how your hobby fits into it? 4. After reading this interview: How do you feel about the game of chess?

39 05 / Checkmate Interview Solution 7/7 Solution :. 1. Lawyer / jurist 2. The jumper / horse, because this figure is very tricky and unconventional. 3. He would like to bear the title of Grand Master one day. 4. An effective training without electronic aids seems almost impossible from his point of view. 5. Quote from the interview: In order to stay at the necessary level, I train around an hour a day. Twice a week I train for one hour with a chess grandmaster from Germany on Skype. Once a week I practice with an international master from Switzerland. We look at different moves and strategies together, prepare for the next tournament. When I train alone, I work with chess databases, books and chess online portals. Professional training is hardly possible today without digital aids and websites! The tournaments take place on the weekends. I work there for 5 to 10 hours at a time.

40 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Teacher information 1/10 Work assignment The students receive the information to sketch and construct a chessboard themselves. Goal The students know the basic dimensions and shapes of the figures. You can combine your manual skills with the top-heavy game. Material instructions Depending on the implementation, various material (see description) Social type PA / EA Time k. A. Additional information: Source:

41 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 2/10 Task: Read the instructions for use and make your own chess board. Making your own chess board With veneers, you can create wood patterns like on a chess or mill board. And that's not that difficult at all! First cut both types of veneer (sapele and maple) to the width of the game board plus about 3 cm overhang. Then one long side is first trimmed. A sharp veneer knife should be used for all cuts.

42 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 3/10 Now the strips have to be cut exactly to width. To do this, cut four or five centimeters wide blocks, place them against a stop and place the veneer sheet with the trimmed long edge against the stop. PRACTICAL TIP: The outer veneer strips are one centimeter wider than the inner ones. The production begins and ends with dark veneer, a total of 9 (!) Strips are joined together. Place a steel ruler (or a square) against the blocks and cut along there. So all edges are exactly parallel.

43 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 4/10 Wet the veneer tape and pin a 5 cm strip of sapele exactly to a 4 cm strip of maple. The visible side points upwards! Once the veneers are stuck together exactly, they are glued with joint tape over the entire length. So now nine strips are connected to each other, the last sapele strip is again 5 cm wide. The strip veneer sheet is now trimmed across the joining edge ...

44 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 5/10 ... and, as already shown with the individual veneer sheets, cut two exactly 5 cm wide (outside) and six exactly 4 cm wide (inside) strips along the steel rail. Move the strips exactly against each other and fix them with adhesive film from the back. Now turn around, check the joint and connect with veneer tape. This is how you make the checkerboard pattern strip by strip. Then carefully remove the adhesive film from the back.

45 06 / Checkmate Making a game of chess yourself Handicraft instructions 6/10 Align the carrier plate (32 x 32 cm) exactly on the back of the veneer and glue fitting pieces of wood to the corners of the veneer. Now work on the chess board begins: wide strips of maple veneer are glued together with narrow sapele strips alternately with veneer tape. It is necessary to cut isosceles triangles from four such strips. The right angle has to be exactly right! Using the veneer knife, carefully cut out the connecting bars in the middle of the second and third maple fields.

46 06 / Checkmate Making a game of chess yourself Handicraft instructions 7/10 Insert sapeli strips and put everything together on the back with adhesive film without joints and in perfect alignment. Turn it around and stick the wet joint tape over all veneer transitions. Gently peel off the adhesive film. Now glue the fitting timbers exactly onto the outer edge, which is still oversized.

47 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 8/10 Using a fine notched spatula, apply white glue over the entire surface of the support board, here 12 mm birch multiplex. Place it on the back of the first sheet of veneer between the wooden pieces. Underneath is a wooden plate with newspaper. Glue the back quickly and then position the second sheet of veneer. Put on the newspaper again. Then press carefully with a second wooden board. Use force!

48 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 9/10 Crossbars placed in the middle and stretched out at the top and bottom ensure contact pressure in the middle. Wait for the glue to set. Then cut off the protruding veneer with the positioning sticks. Slightly moisten the veneer tape on the back and peel it off after a short soaking time. Once dry, carefully sand down to about 240 grit.

49 06 / Checkmate Making a chess game yourself Handicraft instructions 10/10 Paint both sides and the edge clear or let them in with hard wax oil, done! The chess pieces The pieces can be individual and very creative. For example, you can also make characters from films or mythology. It is important that the pieces should not be larger than a square and it must be clear which piece is represented in the game. Otherwise it is very tedious and difficult to play. So you can create your own, very individual chess game!

50 07 / Checkmate chess tournament Teacher information 1/2 work assignment The students organize a chess tournament, create the game board and conduct the tournament independently. Goal The Sch optimize their organizational and planning skills. Material tournament table misc. Material (see planning) For chess boards and pieces, contact the SSB (see additional information on the lesson plan). Social type GA time k. A.

51 07 / Checkmate chess tournament Planning material 2/2 Task: This checklist will help you with the implementation of a chess tournament! Tries to find a solution for each point. Checklist game variants knockout system: Here only the winner of a game continues to play against another winner. This is how the tournament winner is ultimately determined. Table according to points: Here you play different games against different players. A tie gives one point to both of them and a winner gets two points. At the end of the tournament, all of a player's points are added up and whoever has the most points wins! Material: chess boards One table and two chairs for every two players Ev. Chess clocks so that the games cannot go on for too long A tournament plan (create a template or your own plan) Write the name of each participant on a piece of paper for the draw Organization: For the first game the opponents together (when counting points) think about how the next opponent will determine will determine the game master / scribe (he will keep the points / ranking lists) determine general rules (breaks, game length, number of games, etc.) Now everything should be ready to start your tournament! You can also run the tournament over a longer period of time by playing only one game per day or per week. This will make the tournament more exciting!

52 Start Start Tournament table knockout system FINAL The winner of a game always follows the arrow!

53 Name Game 1 Game 2 Game 3 Game 4 Game 5 Game 6 Game 7 Game 8 Game 9 Total