How are orgies usually organized

"Israeli society is less and less aware of the suffering of others"

Yiftach Ashkenazy dedicated the novel to the memory of his father who was buried in Karmiel. He died - shortly before the son finished his military service - in a car accident. Discharged from the army, Yiftach Ashkenazy returned in 2003 to his hometown of Karmiel, which he had become unfamiliar with, in order to literarily deal with what he calls "army racism". The Israeli military, says the 26-year-old, "is breaking the human capacity for empathy".

"For me the checkpoint was a trauma. To have all power, and you can see how people use it and humiliate Palestinians. Of course not everyone does that, but some do. A friend of mine - he was an officer - started the Second Intifada accidentally killed a protester. And he was totally shocked that the army simply closed the file. He received no punishment. That's how the military works. Israeli society is less and less aware of the suffering of others. That was the real thing Last war problem. "

Ashkenazy's fictional characters are all looking for something to hold on to. The author slips into her skin, speaks from her mouth. The résumés of nurses, teachers, pharmacists, students and recruits are interwoven in 18 chapters. A woman who calls herself "the old woman from the bus station" observes a soldier for whom no one is waiting. She invites them to a partner swap party that her husband organizes on a regular basis. A former company commander who works for a security company prefers to read rape reports. He identifies with the perpetrators. A clique of young people meets in old grave caves to conjure up in the dark the spirit of a friend who has fallen in Lebanon. They drink excessively, they take drugs, they have orgies. During the day they meet in the "Memorial Park".

It has a black winding wall. Freshly gold-painted inscriptions of the dead in view of the Holocaust Remembrance Day. If you get there close to this day, you can find the place properly cared for, with the dry wreaths of the municipal businesses around the wall. In the middle is a sculpture in the form of an altar, which was originally a water and fire fountain, but there has been no budget to revive it for years. We used it mainly to open beer bottles.

Parents, from whom the children slip away, try to regain control with the help of superstitious rituals.

"Before Rivka's abortion, they had done a cleansing séance and tried to conjure up Nostradamus, who got angry and attacked them with Hitler (the strongest spirit who could switch between the planes of existence all by himself). They wanted us to help them, him and advised us to run around with a book of psalms. They wanted us to return to the tribe. We laughed at them (...) "

The pseudo-religious shamanism of the parents' generation reinforces the cynicism of the younger ones. They hardly know any other long-term destination than the next trip to India. The characters sound sexist, calculating, lonely and desperate. In the opening and closing chapters, Yiftach Ashkenazy suddenly chooses the first-person perspective. This I, also called "Yiftach" in the end, is a sensitive being. For Ashkenazy, it was necessary for a single voice to resist the cynicism of the other characters. This "Yiftach" looks unsentimentally at its surroundings: at people and buildings. He remembers the ruins of Arab houses and the remains of glass workshops from Byzantine times that are buried under the city of Karmiel. The denied history of the place and its former Arab inhabitants, overgrown by thorn bushes, points the way to a dark future.

"The collapse happens in chapter 15. It's almost an epilogue. This chapter is extremely violent. Nobody forgets that. It provokes, it demands everyone's attention, and it changes thinking. It describes the greatest conflict."

A former sergeant has been holding an Arab and a Jewish girl prisoner in an underground storage room for a month. In a breathless monologue, Ashkenazy reveals the motives of the man who sees himself as a peace-maker, but who really does nothing other than abuse children.

My personal peace initiative came into my head in the military when I was in command of a roadblock in Ramallah, between two houses and olive groves that reminded me of the Karmiel area. (...) In my opinion, I have already earned the Nobel Prize, at least according to the newspaper headlines and the solidarity of common hatred that I have created between peoples. Peoples of united concern, who embrace in fear, will not fight.

The kidnapper plans the moment when the police discover his hiding place. He will shoot himself to stain her with his blood. And before that, he raped the girls. According to his logic, he sows the "seeds of peace". Reading the "Story of the Death of My City" is oppressive. Ashkenazy's characters stagger through hell. Only in physical pain do they still experience the contours of their self. Unmistakably, however, between the verbal transgressions one hears the appeal to learn to be compassionate again. Yiftach Ashkenazy incidentally mentions having read the writings of the Marquis de Sade. It sounds a bit as if he thinks he has to theoretically support his text. But one also understands that the author basically regards the body as something sacred and its integrity remains a commandment. Yiftach Ashkenazy works in Yad Vashem. He leads students through the memorial and brings them together with contemporary witnesses who tell how they survived being imprisoned in the concentration camps. Yiftach Ashkenazy is convinced that a more meaningful task cannot be found at the moment. He has turned his back on Karmiel, the "dead city". In Jerusalem he feels he is in the right place.

"When I'm exhausted, I just walk through the city and look at it. You can also hate Jerusalem. Normally it starts at the beginning of the week on Sunday, but when Friday evening comes and everything comes to rest, it's wonderful here . It remains an inspiring place. "

Yiftach Ashkenazy dedicated the novel to the memory of his father who was buried in Karmiel. He died - shortly before the son finished his military service - in a car accident. Discharged from the army, Yiftach Ashkenazy returned in 2003 to his hometown of Karmiel, which he had become unfamiliar with, in order to literarily deal with what he calls "army racism". The Israeli military, says the 26-year-old, "is breaking the human capacity for empathy".

"For me the checkpoint was a trauma. To have all power, and you can see how people use it and humiliate Palestinians. Of course not everyone does that, but some of them do. A friend of mine - he was an officer - started the Second Intifada accidentally killed a protester. And he was totally shocked that the army simply closed the file. He received no punishment. That's how the military works. Israeli society is less and less aware of the suffering of others. That was the real thing Last war problem. "

Ashkenazy's fictional characters are all looking for something to hold on to. The author slips into her skin, speaks from her mouth. The résumés of nurses, teachers, pharmacists, students and recruits are interwoven in 18 chapters. A woman who calls herself "the old woman from the bus station" observes a soldier for whom no one is waiting. She invites them to a partner swap party that her husband organizes on a regular basis. A former company commander who works for a security company prefers to read rape reports. He identifies with the perpetrators. A clique of young people meets in old grave caves to conjure up in the dark the spirit of a friend who has fallen in Lebanon. They drink excessively, they take drugs, they have orgies. During the day they meet in the "Memorial Park".

It has a black winding wall. Freshly gold-painted inscriptions of the dead in view of the Holocaust Remembrance Day. If you get there close to this day, you can find the place properly cared for, with the dry wreaths of the municipal businesses around the wall. In the middle is a sculpture in the form of an altar, which was originally a water and fire fountain, but there has been no budget to revive it for years. We used it mainly to open beer bottles.

Parents, from whom the children slip away, try to regain control with the help of superstitious rituals.

"Before Rivka's abortion, they had done a cleansing séance and tried to conjure up Nostradamus, who got angry and attacked them with Hitler (the strongest spirit who could switch between the planes of existence all by himself). They wanted us to help them, him and advised us to run around with a book of psalms. They wanted us to return to the tribe. We laughed at them (...) "

The pseudo-religious shamanism of the parents' generation reinforces the cynicism of the younger ones. They hardly know any other long-term destination than the next trip to India. The characters sound sexist, calculating, lonely and desperate. In the opening and closing chapters, Yiftach Ashkenazy suddenly chooses the first-person perspective. This I, also called "Yiftach" in the end, is a sensitive being. For Ashkenazy, it was necessary for a single voice to resist the cynicism of the other characters. This "Yiftach" looks unsentimentally at its surroundings: at people and buildings. He remembers the ruins of Arab houses and the remains of glass workshops from Byzantine times that are buried under the city of Karmiel. The denied history of the place and its former Arab inhabitants, overgrown by thorn bushes, points the way to a dark future.

"The collapse happens in chapter 15. It's almost an epilogue. This chapter is extremely violent. Nobody forgets that. It provokes, it demands everyone's attention, and it changes thinking. It describes the greatest conflict."

A former sergeant has been holding an Arab and a Jewish girl prisoner in an underground storage room for a month. In a breathless monologue, Ashkenazy reveals the motives of the man who sees himself as a peace-maker, but who really does nothing other than abuse children.

"My personal peace initiative came into my head in the military when I was in command of a roadblock in Ramallah, between two houses and olive groves that reminded me of the area around Karmiel. (...) In my opinion, I already have that Nobel Prize deserves, at least according to the newspaper headlines and the solidarity of common hatred that I have created between peoples. Peoples in united concern who embrace in fear will not fight. "

The kidnapper plans the moment when the police discover his hiding place. He will shoot himself to stain her with his blood. And before that, he raped the girls. According to his logic, he sows the "seeds of peace". Reading the "Story of the Death of My City" is oppressive. Ashkenazy's characters stagger through hell. Only in physical pain do they still experience the contours of their self. Unmistakably, however, between the verbal transgressions one can hear the appeal to learn to be compassionate again. Yiftach Ashkenazy incidentally mentions having read the writings of the Marquis de Sade. It sounds a bit as if he thinks he has to theoretically support his text. But one also understands that the author basically regards the body as something sacred and that its integrity remains a commandment. Yiftach Ashkenazy works in Yad Vashem. He leads students through the memorial and brings them together with contemporary witnesses who tell how they survived being imprisoned in the concentration camps. Yiftach Ashkenazy is convinced that a more meaningful task cannot be found at the moment. He has turned his back on Karmiel, the "dead city". In Jerusalem he feels he is in the right place.

"When I'm exhausted, I just walk through the city and look at it. You can also hate Jerusalem. Normally it starts at the beginning of the week on Sunday, but when Friday evening comes and everything comes to rest, it's wonderful here . It remains an inspiring place. "

Yiftach Ashkenazy:
"The story of the death of my city"
(Luchterhand literature publisher)